Community Growing

Case Study: Rhostyllen Allotment Project

On a strip of land between a disused railway line and residential housing in the community of Esclusham (on the outskirts of Wrexham), are 12 allotment plots, used by members of the community to grow food and socialise in a small communal area planted with wild flowers.
Called the Rhostyllen Allotments Project, it is an excellent example of how a local community council can support the development of a growing project – transforming an overgrown piece of land used for dumping rubbish into something valued and useful.
Richard Elias, of Esclusham Community Council, describes how the project has evolved…

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Case Study: Llangollen Community Garden

This organic food-growing community garden, based on the site of an abandoned plot in Llangollen, is owned by Denbighshire County Council which gave permission for the development of community growing in 2012. It’s an excellent example of the process of setting up a community garden on a council site, with a licence rather than a lease.

Catherine Veasey, who has been involved in the development of the garden through the local Friends Of The Earth group, describes more about the garden and how it worked with the council.

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Plans for Social Investment Tax Relief to be Extended

The government plans to extend social investment tax relief to small community farming and horticultural activities, after recommendations during the consultation from the Community Land Advisory Service.

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CLAS Cymru and Cae Tan on Big Lottery Blog

A case Study on the Big Lottery Fund Wales blog highlights the help and support given by the Community Land Advisory Service at Cae Tan, a community supported agriculture site on the Gower in Wales. The site was unfenced and unused for 30 years, but has become a thriving hub of community activity including a shared sheep flock, fruit share scheme and a major programme of tree planting. 

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Case Study: Our Garden (Brit Growers)

A lively community site in Evanstown near Bridgend, the aptly named ‘Our Garden’ has a wide mix of users from across the Ogmore Valley, and is used daily by local people who go to tend their plot or to simply sit and chat with friends and neighbours. They formerly derelict site was transformed after an approach to the landowner, a housing association.

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Finding Land: Community Growing On NHS Land

The National Health Service owns 6.9 million hectares of land across the UK and already provides space for dozens of community growing sites.  If your group is seeking land and think there might be some suitable NHS-owned land available, then an approach is definitely worth making.

Download the following document for more information: Community Growing On NHS Land

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Planning: Planning Policy & Community Growing

Sustain have produced a special guide to using planning policy to meet strategic objectives through community food growing.

The guide brings together examples of planning policies around the UK that support community food growing. It is aimed primarily at planning authorities to help them to use food growing as a way of creating healthy communities. 

This is a specific recommendation within the Planning Practice Guidance that goes with the National Planning Policy Framework for England, but a principle that is relevant across the UK.

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Valuing Grasslands - Environmental Impact Assessment

Community gardens value their local natural environments and are keen to look after native ecosystems. However, some may overlook the habitat value of grassland.

While grassland may not always look appealing or exciting, some areas contain very active and precious ecosystems which should not be disturbed. For example, they may contain wildflowers that are becoming rarer and support a wide range of insects, mammals and birds of prey that feed on them.

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Video: Community Foodie

This Community Foodie Project video shares information about community food growing in rural areas of Bridgend, Vale of Glamorgan and Torfaen (South Wales). Through the support of the Community Foodie Project, local communities have created areas that offer an abundance of locally grown food, as well as education, improvement of health and well-being, social inclusion etc.

The film gives an insight into various land-based issues, as well as inspiration around community food growing. Visit www.communityfoodie.co.uk for more details.

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Case Study: Incredible Edible, Todmorden

A local food coaltion in Northern England. A group of passionate committed local people are aiming to provide access to good local food for all, through working together, learning – from field to classroom to kitchen - and supporting local business.

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